Security Awareness and the Bystander Effect

My latest @ISACA column was posted recently. This time I tackled a hard issue in the human factors space: awareness training. Specifically, I explored the notion that having a good security team may actually impede the effectiveness of a security awareness program. I did this through the application of some concepts from the bystander effect.

You can check it out here: Security Awareness and the Bystander Effect.

Cyber Risk Cassandras

I wrote this latest bit for the @ISACA column after reading Richard Clarke’s book and trying to rationalize how it applies to cyber risk. It’s overly easy to predict failures and impending doom at a macro level, its much harder to do it at the micro level, which is infinitely more interesting and useful.

You can read more here

Lowest Common Risk Denominator

I tackle the notion of risk appetite in this month’s column using some metaphors with which you might be familiar. You don’t get to pick your auto insurance coverage by expressing the number of accidents you are willing to accept, yet that’s how a lot of organizations think about cyber risk. Fortunately, the cyber insurance industry is going to force us all into thinking about risk in dollars, the same as everyone else, because that is the lowest common risk denominator.

You can read more here.

Smart Contracts

I was interviewed for, and quoted in, this ISACA publication around Smart Contracts.

Upon reflection, what we are really seeing is just a continuation of the concept of Code = Law as pointed out by Lawrence Lessig in his 1999 book, Code and Other Law of Cyberspace.

The Smart Contracts doc is a free download (after registration) and can be found here:

http://www.isaca.org/smartcontracts

 

Interesting Times

In my latest column I wanted to call out some of the dichotomy that exists in the cyber world today. There are so many exciting new technologies in the world, and so much more risk inherent in them. Working in risk means that you can’t avoid bad things entirely (any more than you can stop the future from becoming the present), but you also have to weigh the risk of NOT participating in the latest new technology. And that is what makes working in cybersecurity and risk so interesting!

You can read my thoughts on this here.

 

Risk and Regulation

My latest @ISACA article was published today. In it, I focus on the notion of where our authority comes from in Information Security. Too often, in my opinion, we rely on regulation as a source of “why” when articulating control requirements. I think this is dangerous and counter to the very nature of what an effective risk practitioner is.

Take a read and let me know your thoughts!