jumpWhen consulting on a security issue, one of the questions that makes me grind my teeth more than any other is some variation of, “What’re our competitors doing?” My initial reaction is always, “Who cares?” Its really just a useless way to think about security and risk.

In my experience, no one asks this question because they are looking for a way to spend more on security, layer in additional controls to reduce fraud, or simply to reduce risk. No, this question is almost always asked as an offensive against perceived unreasonableness by information security. Its a political tool or a negotiating tactic to cause you to back down. Which should be enough of a reason to dismiss it outright, but there is more nuance to this that causes it to be distasteful.

Your IT risk  decision-making is not a commodity market. Sure there are security commodities, however the decision making cannot be outsourced to other organizations. Think about it, what if you dutifully came back with an answer to this question indicating that not only are our competitors doing not just what  you are recommending but significantly more. Their budget for this is 5 times what you were planning to spend.

Would they then immediately write a check for that difference? Offer an apology to you and then shuffle out the door defeated? No, of course not. Nor should they. The risk tolerance, assets, lines of credit, cash flow, customers, budget, product mix, public profile, threat agent action, loss scenario probabilities are not yours. Simply put your competitor’s risk tolerance and appetite is not yours. As a result, you need to make the best decisions you can with the best (quantitative) data that you have at your disposal. Of course you should seek inspiration from various sources, if you can get it. I love the notion that security folks are a chatty sort that dish endlessly about the goings on in their companies. Security professionals should be fired for such action — you don’t want chatty security people working for you. Information sharing regimes, processes, and protocols exist, but data sharing at that level tends to be categorical which isn’t often useful enough to answer the question being posed. There is one exception to my rant however and that is legal. They probably are the ones who would advocate that budgets and controls be increased to reflect the posture of other organizations. Except legal won’t fund anything, so you have to go to the business anyways.