There is a point where a security exception ceases to be an exception and becomes the rule. Its at times like these that the information security department can swagger in and lay down the law. Put simply, security makes the rest of the business comport to its will, and if push comes to shove security can pull out its piece and compel the action it desires…or else!

Except its the “or else” thats really the problem. Like a modern day Barney Fife, Information Security has no bullets in its gun (we may have some in our breast pocket though-only to be used for emergencies).

This gun metaphor is very helpful for understanding two things about the practice of information security today. First (and obviously) there are the overt violent overtones associated with the imagery above. If we reflect on the perception of security over the past several decades, it’s clear that its viewed as an aggressor. Its a perception that is well earned–keeping things and people safe is by necessity an aggressive career choice, only to be undertaken by those enveloped with machismo. Except in the corporate world this approach is misplaced. Its reminiscent of the over-enthusiastic mall cop, or the former New York City police officer that is now a corporate physical security guard. And this metaphor too is an important lesson in the way information security could be perceived if misapplied (which reminds me of this scene from Goldeneye).

Adapting to the new reality of risk-based security means relinquishing the controls-based security approach that is endemic to the mall cop metaphor above. Which brings me to my second point: If we pull the trigger of that gun, the infecundity of controls-based information security is made plain for all to see. Simply saying “no” to new technology is not an act of machismo anymore; its an act of suicide. Its oftentimes denying the business the very thing it needs to survive. Whether it be cloud, mobile, social media, or BYOD, the modern IT landscape is ripe with opportunities for information security to enable top-line growth, or at the very least to reduce the bottom line. Like the stick-up artist that engenders such fear with its pistol, information security has the ability to effect change, just so long as it doesn’t actually shoot anyone. Hinting at the regulatory hammer(s) to which you are subject is the bullet–its just not in your gun.  Instead, partner with the business to protect against the bullet in the FTCs or PCI Council’s gun, lest you drop the hammer on yours and the business hears the emasculating click of an empty chamber.

In order to achieve success in modern information security programs, there must be an emphasis on the soft skills of negotiation and communication. Effectively communicating a risk scenario using a mature risk taxonomy (one that allows you to communicate threats, control deficiencies, vulnerability, and losses) gives risk decision makers the ability to execute a well-informed decision. And that, after all, is what information security is really all about: enabling decision makers with the information they need to determine if a risk is worth taking.

And now, “Looking Down the Barrel of A Gun” by The Beastie Boys. Apropos.

RIP MCA