A discussion on priority-making, risk, and the nature of humanity

I’m always interested in examples where we make implicit risk decisions. It happens naturally all the time, mostly because we lack the resources (time, skills) to properly evaluate the scenario. Despite being good at keeping us immediately out of harm’s way, this quick decision-making skill set (our “gut” reaction) tends to be wrong very often about long-term risk. Nowhere is this more prevalent than in our own health decisions.

The FAIR risk-assessment framework discusses and flowcharts the reasons for failure to comply with policy; however it is equally applicable to failures in decision making. At a high level, the flow chart goes like this: awareness, resources, motivation (evil, dumb, priorities). It’s usually the priorities that throw us for a loop: after I know what needs done, have the tools to do it, I have to want to do it. Since we’re not often evil or dumb (thank goodness), I have to make it a higher priority than the other things I care about. It’s the same reason that although I see the nail pop in my one wall all the time, I’m unlikely to ever really do anything about it (after all, I’m really busy with this blog and everything…).

It’s through these lenses (implicit decision making and the compliance flowchart) that I would like to discuss the following chart:

This is a chart provided by the FAIR Foundation on their website (no relation to the risk analysis method called FAIR). This chart details the US funding priorities for various disease (mostly -all?- NIH funding). I care about many of these diseases personally, as I’m sure many of you do. It’s because of this personal attachment (my gut reaction), that I’m immediately appalled at the funding priorities that exist. If we are being rationale about our resource allocation, then clearly the diseases that cause the most deaths need the highest levels of funding. On closer evaluation however, there is more to diseases than just death; many diseases substantially limit one or more of the major life activities (to borrow a phrase from the US American’s with Disabilities Act of 1990). Diabetes (especially Type 1) robs you of normal eating habits for the rest of your life, Alzheimer’s takes your mental faculties, and Parkinson’s the steals ability to move regularly (to just name a few – there are many horrible outcomes for many of these diseases).

So if we are all rationale humans, then why are these funding priorities what they are?

There’s a certain amount of complexity associated with these decisions. There is a system of systems responsible for these funding decisions, not the least of which is popularity (there are countless discussions like this happening all over the web). However, the reality is that all rubrics for funding will leave some people’s concerns out of the running. There just aren’t enough resources to go around.

I don’t have the right answers for this problem, but I wanted to use these chart as a mirror for our own IT Risk and Security funding priorities. There are doubtless many pet projects that will garner the most funding in your organization that will not have rationale support from a risk perspective. Fighting this gut-level decision making is the work of IT Risk professionals today. The same as the medical communities that argue for a risk-based approach to research funding, you too should be spending your time and efforts advocating for the reduction of risk in the scenarios that effect your organizations.

Given that you will never work for an organization that has in infinite budget for security (or anything really), nor will you have all the time needed to address every concern, you must prioritize efforts to ensure the best results. Priority-making is inherently a risk-based activity. This is the essence of modern risk management.